Tuesday, March 22, 2005

"The best thing I have ever done"

Anecdotal evidence about malpractice driving physician movement from the Yale alumni mag (via pointoflaw.com):

If people tell you tort reform isn't important, don't believe them. The
contrast between practicing in a highly litigious area versus a low one is
incredible. While I knew it was taking a toll on my life and affecting my
practice style, I had no idea how much until I got out here. Using my clinical
judgment without the threat of second-guessing and Monday-morning quarterbacking
not only improves care, but also drastically cuts down on CYA testing. It's
great to be a doctor rather than a fearful technician wondering from where the
next hit is coming. ...


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7 comments:

job opportunitya said...
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job opportunitya said...
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job opportunitya said...
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plastic surgery said...
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Anonymous said...

Graduated medical school 1990 - practicing since both military/civilian - residency trained/board certified in Emerg Med - moved to FL two years ago to be near family - only made it 3months of practice before my first ever suit for bad outcome case - standard of care met, but when something happens, someone pays - forced to settle (economic decision by medmal insurance) and so join many of my colleauques in the famous 'data bank' for my scarlet letter - this has affected me greatly and still today, the case would have had no different outcome if I saw the same pt - that's just how things happen sometimes - e.g. despite working up a pt, bad things can happen, and since we're not Gods, I cannot predict the future --- would quit medicine today if I had another way to pay the mortgage and raise my family --- just wish I didn't see EVERY patient as a threat to my family .... when will the times change (and by the way, I'd still treat every trial attorney who comes as this is my job and the duty to which I have foresworn many years ago) --- I just wonder when the suits for "Have you ever had a CT scan that was negative and NOW have sometype of cancer? -- you can SUE!"

aish said...
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